Image for Iridology
Iridology

Synonyms/Common Names/Related Substances:

  • Angle of Fuch's, applied iridology, Augendiagnostik (German), Bexel Irina, central heterochromia, cholesterol ring, ciliary zone, collarette, connective tissue type, Deck's pancreatic signs, density, flower, healing lines, inner-directed personality, irigraphy, iris biometrics, iris diagnosis, jewel, lacuna, left-brain development, lesion, lipemic diathesis, lipid ring, lymphatic rosary, nutritive zone, outer-directed personality, papillary margin, parasite lines, pigment ruff, pinguecula, prolapsus of transverse colon, psora, pterygium, pupil size, pupil sphincter muscle, radial furrows, radial solaris, radials, rarefaction, Rayid model, right-brain development, ring of determination, ring of harmony, ring of purpose, rings of freedom, sclerology, scurf ring, shading, shakers, sodium ring, stomach ring, stream, stress rings, tobacco snuffing, topo labile, topo stabile, trabeculae, transversal, vascular transversal, weak iris.

Clinical Bottom Line/Effectiveness

Brief Background:

  • Iridology is the examiniation of the pigmentation irregularities in the iris as a means of diagnosis (1). The modern concept of iridology was first proposed by Philippi Meyers in the 1600s, and then developed more fully in Hungary in the 1800s by Dr. Ignatz von Pezcely and Nils Liljequist. Proponents of the technique claim that all bodily organs are represented on the surface of the iris via intricate neural connections (2).
  • Iridologists visually assess irises by directly examining them or by studying detailed photographs. Some iridologists use sclerology, a technique that studies lines on the sclera (the white part of the eye), which they believe can show changes in health patterns and conditions. One type of iridology, called Rayid, studies eye patterns to evaluate mental, emotional, spiritual and physical balance. Naturopaths and other practitioners may also practice iridology.
  • There is limited scientific research available on iridology (3). Conventional medicine regards iridology as an unsubstantiated alternative diagnostic technique. Although some studies have suggested iridology may have potential validity as a diagnostic tool, these claims are largely unsupported.
  • In recent years, computerized assessment tools employing principles of iridology have been developed to advance the scientific exploration of this alternative diagnostic method. However, this work remains exploratory (4;5;6).

Dosing/Toxicology

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Precautions/Contraindications

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Interactions

Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

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Mechanism of Action

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History

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Evidence Table

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Evidence Discussion

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Products Studied

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.