Image for Acute phase proteins
Acute phase proteins

Related Terms

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Background

  • Acute phase proteins are molecules in the blood that either increase or decrease in response to tissue injury including trauma, heart attack, infections, burns, chronic inflammation (like rheumatoid arthritis), and cancer.
  • When the body is injured, immune cells flood to the area to help the body heal and/or fight off harmful substances (such as bacteria or viruses). This increase in immune cells leads to inflammation in the body.
  • Acute phase proteins help the body respond to tissue injury. For instance, some proteins may help cells destroy harmful substances, such as bacteria, while others may help the blood clot and prevent blood loss. When acute phase proteins respond to tissue injury, this is called an acute phase reaction.
  • It remains unknown exactly how the acute phase proteins are stimulated. However, research suggests that the chemicals released during injury may activate the proteins.
  • Further content available for subscribers only.

Ceruloplasmin

  • Content available for subscribers only.

C-Reactive Protein (Crp)

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Fibrinogen

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Ferritin

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Haptoglobin

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Serum Albumins

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Serum Amyloid a (Saa)

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Transferrin

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Author Information

  • Content available for subscribers only.

References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

  • Content available for subscribers only.
The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.