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Arum

Synonyms/Common Names/Related Substances:

  • Adam-and-Eve, adder's root, Araceae (family), Árón plamatý (Czech), Aronenkraut (German), Aronstab (German), Aron-stab (German), arsenic, Arum dioscorides, Arum maculatum, arum tacheté (French), bobbins, calcium oxalate crystals, Chindlichrut (German), cocky baby, cuckoo point, cuckoopint, cyanogenic glycosides, cypress powder, Dansk ingefær (Danish), dieffenbachia, Dittichrut (German), dragon root, Ekelblume (German), Eselsohr (German), fläckig munkhätta (Swedish), flekkmunkehette (Norwegian), foltos kontyvirág (Hungarian), friar's cowl, gaglee, gefläckter Aronstab (German), gefleckter Aronstab (German), gemeiner Aronstab (German), gevlekte aronskelk (Dutch), gigaro scuro (Italian), gouet (French), gouet tacheté (French), kings and queens, kontyvirág (Hungarian), ladysmock, lectin, lords and ladies, obrazki plamiste (Polish), parson and clerck, plettet arum (Danish), plettet ingefær (Danish), Portland arrowroot, quaker, ramp, Ronechrut (German), soluble oxalates, spotted arum, starchwort, tähniline aarum (Estonian), Trommelsschlägel (German), wake robin, Zehrwurz (German).
  • Combination product examples: Roxalia® sore throat (homeopathic preparation containing Arum Triphyllum 3c).

Clinical Bottom Line/Effectiveness

Brief Background:

  • Plants of the genus Arum are poisonous due to their calcium oxalate content. Currently, there is no standard, accepted medicinal use of the plant, although historical evidence indicates it may have been used to treat prostate disease and skin conditions. According to secondary sources, the roasted root of Arum maculatum, common in northern Europe, is edible. The root of this species was ground and traded as Portland sago, and used like "salop" or "salep" (a common drink before the popularization of tea and coffee), or as a substitute for arrowroot.
  • Leptin extracts from Arum are currently being examined for their antispermatozoic properties.
  • At this time, high-quality human trials supporting the efficacy of Arum are lacking for any indication.

Dosing/Toxicology

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Precautions/Contraindications

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Interactions

Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

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Mechanism of Action

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History

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Evidence Table

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Evidence Discussion

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Products Studied

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.