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Bael fruit (Aegle marmelos)

Synonyms/Common Names/Related Substances:

  • Aegelenine, aegeline, Aegle marmelos, allocryptopine, alloimperatorin methyl ether, aurapten, β-sitosterol, bael, bael tree, bel, beli, Bengal quince, betulinic acid, bilva, bilwa, butyl p-tolyl sulfide, butylated hydroxyanisole, dimethoxy coumarin, essential oil, ethyl phosphonic acid diethyl ester, hexachloro ethane, Indian bael, lupeol, luvangetin, marmelide, marmelosin, marmenol, marmesin, methyl linoleate, montanine, N-p-cis-coumaroyltyramine, N-p-trans-coumaroyltyramine, O-isopentenylhalfordinol, O-methylhalfordinol, palmitic acid, praealtin D, psoralen, rues, Rutaceae (family), rutacées, rutaretin, rutin, scopoletin, Shivadume, shivaphala, skimmianine, sripal, tannic acid, tannins (condensed), trans-cinnamic acid, umbelliferone, valencic acid, vilvam, wood apple, xanthotoxin, xanthotoxol.

Clinical Bottom Line/Effectiveness

Brief Background:

  • Indian bael, an indigenous plant of India, has spread over wide areas of southeast Asia.
  • This plant has use in traditional medicine, such as that of India and Bangladesh. There is reputed medicinal use of the ripe fruit and unripe fruit, as well as the roots, leaves and branches.
  • A familiar use is treatment for diarrhea, although antidiarrheal effectiveness lacks substantiation in the standard medical literature.
  • Recent studies show in vitro and animal evidence that Indian bael, as various extracts, has analgesic, antidiabetic, antidiarrheal, antifungal, antihistaminic, antihyperlipidemic, anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, antipyretic, antiulcer, radioprotective, and thyroidal effects. These pharmacological effects are of unknown clinical impact, given the contemporary absence of documentation of such in the standard medical literature. There consequently is a need for clinical studies that substantiate therapeutic uses of Indian bael.

Dosing/Toxicology

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Precautions/Contraindications

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Interactions

Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

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Mechanism of Action

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History

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Evidence Table

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Evidence Discussion

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Products Studied

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.