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Bean pod (Phaseolus vulgaris)

Synonyms/Common Names/Related Substances:

  • Alpha-AI, alpha-amylase inhibitor, anasazi bean, azufrado, baked bean, bayo bean, bean, black bean, black Jamapa bean, borlotto bean, bush bean, butter bean, cannellino bean, catalase, chymotrypsin inhibitor, common bean, coumestrol, cranberry bean, cyanidin, daidzein, delphinidin, Fabaceae (family), ferulic, field bean, flageolet bean, Flor de Mayo, French bean, French string bean, frijole bean, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, Great Northern bean, green bean, haricot bean (Aztec), haricot vert, haricots verts, hydroperoxides, kaempferol, kidney bean, kidney bean pods, kintoki bean, lablab bean, large white bean, legume, Leguminosae (family), lima beans, malvidin, marrow beans, Mexican beans, Mexican common beans, navy bean, pea bean, pectic acid, pelargonidin, peonidin, Perla black bean, petunidin, Phase2®, Phaseolamin 2250®, Phaseoli fructus sine semine, phaseolin, Phaseolus vulgaris, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Acrelin 4, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Annabel, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Borlotto, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Canadian Wonder, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Flageolet, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Goldstar, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Great Northern, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Greensleeves, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Kaiser Wilhelm, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Kentucky Wonder, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Keystone, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Kinghorn, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Magna, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Masai, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Negro Jamapa, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Pinto, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Processor, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Provider, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Red Kidney, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Red Mexican, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Sanilac, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Saxa, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Spotted Bean, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Tebo, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Tendergreen, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. The Prince, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Top Crop, Phaseolus vulgaris cv. White Cloud Bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L., Phase 2 Starch Neutralizer®, phytoalexins, phytoestrogens, phytohemagglutinin, pinto bean, quercetin, red bean, red kidney bean, red speckled bean, scarlet runner, seed-free bean pods, snap bean, string bean, stringless bean, sugar bean, superoxide dismutase, Tora-mame, turtle bean, trypsin inhibitor, wax bean, white bean, white cloud bean, white kidney bean.

Clinical Bottom Line/Effectiveness

Brief Background:

  • The common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) is one of the most important grain legumes that belong to Fabaceae, a family of plants with worldwide distribution. The green bean pods are cooked as a vegetable, and some varieties are stored dry, then rehydrated prior to cooking. Leaves are occasionally used as a salad.
  • Bean seeds are considered to be "starch blockers," as they interfere with the breakdown of complex carbohydrates (starches) into simple sugars by blocking alpha-amylase activity, and they reduce gastrointestinal absorption of these carbohydrates. Bean pods are thereby believed to be helpful in obesity and weight loss programs, as well as obesity-related diseases such as diabetes mellitus type 2 and cardiovascular disease.
  • According to secondary sources, bean pod may be useful for acne, burns, diarrhea, dropsy, dysentery, eczema, hiccups, itch, rheumatism, sciatica, postmenopausal osteoporosis, kidney or bladder stones, constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, diverticulosis, and urinary tract infections, although there is insufficient evidence in support of these uses.
  • Bean pods are also commonly believed to have antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiparasitic, antiviral, carminative, emollient, depurative, and diuretic properties. Well-designed clinical trials are needed before recommendations can be made regarding taking this product for any health condition.

Dosing/Toxicology

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Precautions/Contraindications

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Interactions

Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

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Mechanism of Action

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History

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Evidence Table

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Evidence Discussion

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Products Studied

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.