Image for Mist bredina ( spp.)
Mist bredina (Bridelia spp.)

Synonyms/Common Names/Related Substances:

  • Adamarudu (Tamil), aga (Nigeria), akamati (Togo), asana (Marathi, Kannada, Sanskrit), asaragba (Nigeria), baboni (Guinea), babooni (Burkina Faso, Mali), babuni saba (Burkina Faso), badia, bahukandaki (Sanskrit), barié (Ivory Coast), bemebenku (West Africa), Bridelia atroviridis, Bridelia cathartica, Bridelia crenulata, Bridelia ferruginea, Bridelia glauca, Bridelia grandis, Bridelia micrantha, Bridelia ndellensis, Bridelia retusa Spreng., Bridelia scandens, Bridelia scleroneura, burburumhi (Nigeria), cellepuri (Burkina Faso), choluhae (Togo), dafi (West Africa), da-fing saba (Guinea), doho (Ghana), dorowan birni (Nigeria), ekavira (Sanskrit), Euphorbiaceae, féféhi (Ivory Coast), gayo, g'bété (Burkina Faso), geio (Bengali), gli (Ivory Coast), gojji (Kannada), gôn (Ivory Coast), gudi, gulumbi (Nigeria), gulummehi (Nigeria), hedionbiga (Niger), hionmonli (Togo), hira (West Africa), honsuk-okué (West Africa), ìrà (Nigeria), ìràodàn (Nigeria), irigo (Ivory Coast), kaddafi (Nigeria), kaduga (Tamil), kaini (Malayalam), kaj, kaja, kaji (Hindi), kajja, kandakasana (Sanskrit), kasi, kassi (Hindi), kensange abia (Nigeria), khaja (Hindi), kirni (West Africa), kismi (Nigeria), kisni (West Africa), kizni (Nigeria), kojuteki (Burkina Faso), kolo (Togo), komanji (Kannada), kora maddi (Telugu), koyamarwa (Kannada), kpépéla (West Africa), kpine (Nigeria), kui (Sierra Leone), kurni (Nigeria), lammulam-muki (Nigeria), marehi (Nigeria), mist bredina, mukkaini (Malayalam), mulkaini (Malayalam), mullankaini (Malayalam), mulluhonne (Kannada), mulluvenga (Malayalam), mullu-vengai (Tamil), nakru (Ivory Coast), nakurugo (Ivory Coast), nasinage (Kannada), olá (Nigeria), pekpéla (West Africa), Phyllanthaceae, Phyllanthoideae, rang thon (Thailand), saba (West Africa), sabua (Mali), saga (West Africa), sagba (West Africa), sagha (Burkina Faso), sagua (West Africa), sagua lé (West Africa), sagué (West Africa), saguin (Mali), sea (West Africa), seikchi, seŋseyohi (Burkina Faso), spinous kino tree, teng nam, tiakoroko (Ivory Coast), tiblen felé (Burkina Faso), tukwé (Ivory Coast), uomo (West Africa), wallinjang (Ghana), warrinjung (Ghana), yumpo (Togo), zendi (Nigeria).

Clinical Bottom Line/Effectiveness

Brief Background:

  • Members of the genus Bridelia are found throughout tropical and subtropical regions of the world, especially in Africa and Asia (1). Of the 60-70 members of this genus, the most commonly studied species are Bridelia ferruginea and Bridelia retusa. Other species that have been reported in the literature are Bridelia atroviridis, Bridelia cathartica, Bridelia crenulata, Bridelia glauca, Bridelia grandis, Bridelia micrantha, Bridelia ndellensis, Bridelia scandens, and Bridelia scleroneura.
  • Bridelia retusa, also called the spinous kino tree, is a medium-to-large-sized (10-20m high) tree with rigid leathery leaves and strong spines. It is a drought-hardy species. Clusters of flowers blossom on mostly leafless twigs from May to July. The leaves are believed to be effective against intestinal worms when eaten by cattle. The pea-sized, purple-black fruit ripens in December to January. The fruit is edible raw, having a somewhat sweet and astringent (dry, puckering) taste. The dull red wood is used for construction, railway ties, fuel, rafters, posts, floorboards, and agricultural implements.
  • The bark and leaves of Bridelia retusa are used in Ayurvedic medicine, due to its pungent, bitter, and heating properties (1). The plant reportedly pacifies vitiated vata and pitta, two of the three organizing principles (doshas) responsible for maintaining homeostasis in Ayurveda. Vata (air and water) is involved in dynamic bodily functions, such as blood circulation, peristalsis, and elimination of food. Pitta (fire and water) is involved in metabolic activities of digestion and biochemical reactions. The bark is used as a liniment (topical medicine) with sesame oil for rheumatism and also to treat urinary conditions.
  • Several Bridelia species are used by traditional healers to treat dysentery, hemorrhoids, hemorrhage, heavy menstrual bleeding, leukorrhea, arthritis, diabetes, wounds, ulcers, poisoning, abdominal pain, cardiovascular, and gynecological conditions, and as a contraceptive. They are also used as antiamebic, antianemic, antibacterial, anticonvulsant, antidiabetic, antidiarrheal, antihelminthic, anti-inflammatory, antimalarial, antinociceptive, antiviral, and hypoglycemic treatments.
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Dosing/Toxicology

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Precautions/Contraindications

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Interactions

Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

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Mechanism of Action

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History

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Evidence Table

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Evidence Discussion

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Products Studied

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.