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Bulbous buttercup (Ranunculus bulbosus)

Synonyms/Common Names/Related Substances:

  • Anemonic acid, anemonin, bachelor's buttons, bachelor's cheese, blister flower, blister plant, blister weed, bouton d'or (French), bulbosus, bulbous crowfoot, burrwort, butter and cheese, buttercup, butter flower, butterrose, common buttercup, crazy weed, crazyweed, crowfoot, cuckoo-buds of yellow hue, cuckow buds of yellow hue, field buttercup, frogsfoot, giltcup, goldcup, goldknob, gowan, jaunet (French), kingcups, L-caffeoylglucose, meadow bloom, meadow buttercup, protoanemonin, Ranunculaceae (family), ranunculin, Ranunculus acris, Ranunculus bulbosus, St. Anthony's rape, St. Anthony's turnip, tall crowfoot, tall field buttercup, upright meadow crowfoot, yellow weed.

Clinical Bottom Line/Effectiveness

Brief Background:

  • Bulbous buttercup (Ranunculus bulbosus) is named for the uniquely bulbous, white protrusion that is found at the base of the stem.
  • Traditionally in Europe, the leaves, stem, flowers, and root were picked and ground for topical use for dermatologic complaints and pain. It was also swallowed to purge the gastrointestinal system. Bulbous buttercup was also used by some Native American tribes.
  • All parts of the bulbous buttercup are now known to be poisonous. The active properties of bulbous buttercup are thought to be destroyed upon heating or drying.
  • Bulbous buttercup contains acrid, harsh chemicals that cause uncomfortable and severe reactions wherever it comes into contact with the body. Because of this, bulbous buttercup is not a frequently used herbal plant. There are no available high-quality clinical trials evaluating the use of bulbous buttercup for medicinal purposes.

Dosing/Toxicology

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Precautions/Contraindications

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Interactions

Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

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Mechanism of Action

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History

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Evidence Table

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Evidence Discussion

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Products Studied

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.