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Cashew

Synonyms/Common Names/Related Substances:

  • 2-methoxyphenol, 2S albumin, acajaiba, acajou, acaju, acajuiba, alanine, alcayoiba, alpha-catechin, alpha-linolenic acid, Ana o 1, Ana o 2, Ana o 3, anacarde, anacardic acids, anacardier (French), Anacardiaceae (family), Anacardium curatellifolium, Anacardium occidentale, Anacardium occidentale L. (Anacardiaceae) leaves, anacardo (Spanish), anacardol, andi parippu (Malayalam), antimony, arabinose, benzoic acid, benzyl alcohol, beta-damascenone, bhilawanols, biflavonoids, cacajuil, cajou (French), caju (Portuguese), cajueiro, caprylic acid, cardanol, cardol, cashew apple nectar, casho, cashu, Cassavium pomiferum, delta-decalactone, delta-octalactone, (E,E)-2,4-decadienal, (E,Z)-2,4-decadienal, East Indian almond, eugenol, europium, folacin, furfuryl mercaptan, gadoleic acid, gajus (Malay), gallic acid, gamma-decalactone, gingkol, glucuronic acid, glutamic acid, godambi (Kannada), hafnium, hexanal, histidine, hydroxybenzoic acid, isoleucine, isovaleric acid, jambu, jambu golok, jambu mete, jambu monyet, jambu terong, jeedi pappu (Telugu), jocote maranon, kaempferols, kasoy, lauric acid, legumin, legumins, L-epicatechin, leucine, leucocyanidin, leucopelargonidine, limonene, linoleic acid, maranon, merey, methional, methylglucuronic acid, Mundhiri paruppu (Tamil), myristic acid, naringenin, noix d'acajou (French), oleic acid, oxalic acid, palmitic acid, palmitoleic acid, phenolic compounds, phenylethyl alcohol, phenylalanine, phytosterols, pomme, pomme cajou, proline, quercetin-glycoside, salicylic acid, samarium, scandium, selenium, Semecarpus anacardium, Semecarpus anacardium (SA) Linn. (related species), Semecarpus australiensis (related species), serine, squalene, stearic acid, tannin, trans-hex-2-enal tryptophan, vicilin, (Z)-1,5-octadien-3-one, (Z)-2-nonenal.

Clinical Bottom Line/Effectiveness

Brief Background:

  • The cashew nut tree is native to Brazil, and northern and western South America. Cashew nuts are commonly eaten as food around the world. Cashew nuts are a source of protein and fat and are eaten as is, lightly salted, or sugared. In certain areas of the world, other parts of the tree are also consumed, such as the leaf in Malaysia and the fruit in South America.
  • The cashew nut tree, poison ivy, and poison oak are in the same botanical family, Anacardiaceae (1), and they share similar chemicals, which cause allergic contact dermatitis.
  • A diet high in cashew nuts increased baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), in which alterations contribute to the reciprocal reduction of parasympathetic activity and increase of sympathetic activity that accompany the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases, in patients with metabolic syndrome (MS) (2); however, a diet high in cashew nuts had no effect on hemostatic factors, such as von Willebrand factor antigen, fibrinogen, factor VII coagulant activity, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 activity, tissue plasminogen activator activity, or thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor, in patients with MS (3).
  • Cashew has been used by many cultures as a treatment for diarrhea, although at this time there is a lack of high-quality, controlled human trials to support its use for any indication.

Dosing/Toxicology

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Precautions/Contraindications

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Interactions

Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

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Mechanism of Action

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History

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Evidence Table

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Evidence Discussion

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Products Studied

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.