Image for Coenzyme Q10
Coenzyme Q10

Synonyms/Common Names/Related Substances:

  • 2,3-Dimethoxy-5 methyl-6-decaprenyl benzoquinone, 6-[10-hydroxydecyl]-2,3-dimethoxy-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone, All-Q™, Andelir®, atovaquone, Bio-Quinone®, Capsule Bio-Quinone, Coenzyme Q, Co-enzyme Q10, Coenzyme Q(50), CoenzymeQ, CoQ, CoQ10, Co-Q10, CoQ-10, CoQ(50), CV-2619, Heartcin®, hydroxydecyl ubiquinone, idebenone (synthetic analog), Kaneka Q10™, Kino-Q-10, MitoQ, MitoQ10, mitoquinone, Neuquinone®, noben, prenylquinones, Q10, Q-Gel®, Solu™ Q10, SterolQ10, Taidecanone®, ubidecarenone, ubiquinol-10, ubiquinone, ubiquinone-10, ubiquinone-Q10, Udekinon®, vitamin q10, vitamin Q10.
  • Combination product examples: Phototrop® (acetyl-L-carnitine, n-3 fatty acids, and coenzyme Q10), PycnoQ10 (Pycnogenol® plus CoQ10), Cutanova Nanorepair Q10 cream, Proxeed® (L-carnitine, acetyl-L-carnitine, fructose, citric acid, selenium, zinc, ascorbic acid, cyanocobalamin, folic acid, and CoQ10).

Clinical Bottom Line/Effectiveness

Brief Background:

  • Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), also known as ubiquinone, is endogenously produced and serves as a cofactor in oxidative respiration for the Krebs cycle and the electron transport chain. Additionally, CoQ10 is a fat-soluble antioxidant. CoQ10 levels decrease with age and have also been observed to be low in patients with certain genetic disorders (1), cardiovascular diseases, muscular dystrophies, Parkinson's disease, cancers, diabetes, and HIV/AIDS (2).
  • Supplemental CoQ10 may increase endogenous tissue levels and activity of CoQ10 significantly when tissue levels are low. CoQ10 deficiencies are detected by assay of the succinate dehydrogenase-CoQ10 activity or measurements of serum CoQ10 levels.
  • The strongest evidence for the use of the CoQ10 synthetic analog idebenone is for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Evidence of benefit for CoQ10 itself is lacking for Alzheimer's disease. There is some good evidence in support of the use of CoQ10 for blood pressure reduction and heart failure.
  • Adequate evidence is lacking for other potential uses of CoQ10, although some promising uses include age-related macular degeneration, exercise-induced angina, asthma, chronic fatigue syndrome, lipid lowering, mitral valve prolapse in children, intraoperative cardioprotection, periodontitis, muscular dystrophies, Parkinson's disease, breast cancer, chronic renal failure, idiopathic asthenozoospermia, and mitochondrial diseases such as Kearns-Sayre syndrome, and treating the adverse side effects from chemotherapy in children.
  • Further content available for subscribers only.

Dosing/Toxicology

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Precautions/Contraindications

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Interactions

Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Mechanism of Action

  • Content available for subscribers only.

History

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Evidence Table

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Evidence Discussion

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Products Studied

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Author Information

  • Content available for subscribers only.

References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

  • Content available for subscribers only.
The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.