Image for Autosomal dominant disease
Autosomal dominant disease

Related Terms

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Background

  • Chromosomes contain the genetic material found in all cells. Each human cell has 23 pairs of chromosomes, including one pair of sex chromosomes and 22 pairs of non-sex chromosomes called autosomes. The sex chromosomes include the X chromosome and the Y chromosome. Females have two X chromosomes, while males have one X chromosome and one Y chromosome.
  • Genes are found within the chromosomes of all organisms. An individual's genes are present in a large molecule called deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). DNA is made up of different combinations of four nucleic acids (adenine, thymine, cytosine, guanine), which are arranged in different lengths. The sequence of these molecules provides the "code," or instructions, for construction of each of the proteins involved in the development, growth, and function of all the cells in the body. An autosomal dominant disorder may occur when the nucleic acid sequences that make up individual genes are incorrect, or mutated. When a gene is mutated, the protein that it codes for may stop functioning or may no longer function properly, which can cause a disorder or disease.
  • Autosomes are the non-sex chromosomes. Individuals have two copies or alleles of the 22 autosomes (one copy inherited from each parent). Each parent can only pass one allele, or version of their genes, to their child. Which copy is passed down is determined by chance.
  • Autosomal dominant disorders are caused by a mutation in an autosomal gene. In order to have an autosomal dominant disorder, only one copy of the gene (inherited from either parent) needs to contain a disease-causing mutation. This is different from autosomal recessive disorders, in which a person needs to inherit two copies of a mutant gene to be affected by the disorder. Because males and females share the same autosomal chromosomes, they are affected equally by autosomal dominant disorders.
  • Further content available for subscribers only.

Risk Factors

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Causes

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Signs and Symptoms

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Types of the Disease

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Diagnosis

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Complications

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Treatment

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Integrative Therapies

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Prevention

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Author Information

  • Content available for subscribers only.

References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

  • Content available for subscribers only.
The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.