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Bone cancer

Related Terms

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Background

  • Bone cancer occurs when bone cells grow uncontrollably. Unlike normal cells, cancer cells do not stop reproducing after they have doubled 50-60 times. These abnormal cells form clumps of tissue, called tumors, inside bones. The first symptom of bone cancer is typically pain in the affected bone(s). Sometimes, a bump either on the bone or in the tissues surrounding the bone may be felt.
  • Primary bone cancer, or cancer that starts in the bone cells, is rare. Fewer than 2,500 Americans are diagnosed with this type of cancer each year. Children are more likely to develop primary bone cancer than adults.
  • Most cases of bone cancer occur when cancer from another part of the body, such as breast, prostate, or lung, has spread to bone cells. This is sometimes called metastatic bone cancer or secondary bone cancer.
  • The most common types of bone cancer are osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, and Ewing's sarcoma. These cancers can be primary or secondary cancer.
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Causes

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Signs and Symptoms

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Diagnosis

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Complications

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Treatment

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Integrative Therapies

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Prevention

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.