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Couch grass (Agropyron repens,Elymus repens)

Synonyms/Common Names/Related Substances:

  • Agropyron cristatum L., Agropyron desertorum, Agropyron elongatum, Agropyron intermedium, Agropyron mongolicum, Agropyron pectiniforme, Agropyron repens L. Beauv., Agropyron scabrifolium El Palmar INTA, Agropyron scabrifolium Seleccion Anguil, Agropyron smithii, Agropyron trachycaulum, Agropyron trichophorum, ayrik, chiendent, common couch, creeping quackgrass, crested wheatgrass, cutch, devil's grass, dog grass, durfa grass, echte quecke, Elymus repens, Elytrigia repens, grama, grama de las boticas, grama del norte, gramigna, gramigua, Gramineae (family), groesrod graminis rhizome, joula, kweek, najm, nejil, pied de poule, Poaceae (family), quackgrass, quick grass, quitch grass, Scotch quelch, Scotch grass, squaw wein, squaw wijn, triticum, Triticum repens L., twitch, twitchgrass, vigne squaw, wheat grass, witch grass.

Clinical Bottom Line/Effectiveness

Brief Background:

  • Couch grass is stated to possess diuretic properties due to the presence of carbohydrates such as mannitol and inulin.
  • It has been traditionally used for urinary tract infections and conditions relating to the kidneys, such as kidney stones. The essential oil has been used for its antimicrobial effects, while the extracts of couch grass have been used as a dietary component in patients with diabetes.
  • There are no formal clinical data available, however, to support these claims. Literature on couch grass is primarily in journals on botany and genomics.

Dosing/Toxicology

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Precautions/Contraindications

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Interactions

Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

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Mechanism of Action

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History

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Evidence Table

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Evidence Discussion

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Products Studied

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.