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Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)

Synonyms/Common Names/Related Substances:

  • Artemetin, Asteraceae (family), beta-carotene, blowball, caffeic acid, cankerwort, Cichoroideae (subfamily), clock flower, common dandelion, Compositae (family), dandelion herb, dandelion T-1 extract, dent de lion (French), diente de leon, dudhal, dumble-dor, epoxide, esculetin, fairy clock, fortune teller, hokouei-kon, huang hua di ding (yellow flower earth nail), Irish daisy, Lactuceae (tribe), Leontodon taraxacum, lion's teeth, lion's tooth, Lowenzahn (German), Lowenzahnwurzel (German), lutein, luteolin, luteolin-7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, mælkebøtte, milk gowan, min-deul-rre, mok's head, mongoloid dandelion, pee in the bed, pissenlit (French), piss-in-bed, potassium, pries' crown, priest's crown, puffball, pu gong ying, pu kung ying, quercetin, radix Taraxaci, stigmasterol, swine snout, Taraxaci herba, taraxacum, Taraxacum mongolicum, Taraxacum officinale, Taraxacum palustre, Taraxacum vulgare, taraxasteryl acetate, telltime, vitamin A, white endive, wild endive, witch gowan, witches' milk, yellow flower earth nail.

Clinical Bottom Line/Effectiveness

Brief Background:

  • Dandelion is a member of the Asteraceae (Compositae) family and is closely related to chicory. It is a perennial herb, native throughout the northern hemisphere, and found growing wild in meadows, pastures and waste grounds of temperate zones.
  • Dandelion root and leaf are used widely in Europe for gastrointestinal ailments. The European Scientific Cooperative on Phytotherapy (ESCOP) recommends dandelion root for "restoration of hepatic and biliary function, dyspepsia, and loss of appetite." The German Commission E authorizes the use of combination products containing dandelion root and herb to treat biliary abnormalities, appetite loss, and dyspepsia, and for stimulation of diuresis. Some modern naturopathic physicians assert that dandelion may detoxify the liver and gallbladder, reduce side effects of medications metabolized by the liver, and relieve symptoms associated with liver disease.
  • Dandelion leaves are a source of vitamin A, containing up to 1,400 IU per 100g.
  • Traditionally, the herb is not suggested to be taken in individuals with liver or gallbladder disease, according to the belief that dandelion stimulates bile secretion (an assertion that lacks evidence in animal or human studies).
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Dosing/Toxicology

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Precautions/Contraindications

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Interactions

Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

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Mechanism of Action

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History

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Evidence Table

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Evidence Discussion

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Products Studied

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.