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Euphorbia

Synonyms/Common Names/Related Substances:

  • Amygdaloides latex, asthma spurge, balsam spurge, bisabolane sesquiterpenoid, caper spurge, Christmas flower, dieterpenoids (segetanes, jatrophanes, paralianes), Euphpekinensin, Euphorbia acaulis, Euphorbia alkaloid, Euphorbia antiquorum, Euphorbia balsamifera, Euphorbia capitata, Euphorbia characias, Euphorbia chrysocoma, Euphorbia decipiens, Euphorbia dendroides, Euphorbia dracunculoides, Euphorbia ebracteolata, Euphorbia esula, Euphorbia fischeriana, Euphorbia fischeriana Steud., Euphorbia fulgens, Euphorbia helioscopia, Euphorbia hermentiana, Euphorbia heterophylla, Euphorbia hierosolymitana, Euphorbia hirta, Euphorbia hylonoma, Euphorbia kansui, Euphorbia lagascae, Euphorbia lancifolia, Euphorbia latex, Euphorbia lathyris, Euphorbia leuconeura, Euphorbia marginata, Euphorbia myrsinites, Euphorbia neriifolia, Euphorbia obtusifolia, Euphorbia paralias, Euphorbia pekinensis, Euphorbia peplus, Euphorbia pilulifera, Euphorbia poisonii, Euphorbia pubescens, Euphorbia pulcherrima, Euphorbia rigida, Euphorbia royleana, Euphorbia serpyllifolia, Euphorbia soongarica, Euphorbia sororia, Euphorbia tinctoria, Euphorbia tirucalli, Euphorbia triangularis, Euphorbia variegate, Euphorbia wallichii, Euphorbiaceae (family), ixbut, leafy spurge, Mediterranean spurge, milkweed, petty spurge, pillbearing spurge, poinsetta, poinsettia, radium weed, spotted spurge, snakeweed, thyme-leaves spurge, triterpenes, wolf's milk extract, ZeQi.

Clinical Bottom Line/Effectiveness

Brief Background:

  • There are over 2,000 species of Euphorbia in the world, ranging from annual weeds to trees. Most originate in Africa and Madagascar, and a significant percentage of these are succulent. All contain latex and have a unique flower structure.
  • Traditionally, Euphorbia species have been used internally as laxatives and externally for rheumatism and skin conditions. However, nearly all the Euphorbia species are poisonous and exude an acrid milky fluid when broken. Natives in many cultures used various Euphorbia species as arrow poison.
  • Euphorbia is stated to possess antitussive, antifungal and antitumor properties. There is mixed evidence showing Euphorbia's effectiveness for chronic bronchitis, eczema, epilepsy and oral inflammation.
  • Stronger methodological studies are needed to ascertain the therapeutic effectiveness of Euphorbia species before any conclusions can be drawn.

Dosing/Toxicology

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Precautions/Contraindications

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Interactions

Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

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Mechanism of Action

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History

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Evidence Table

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Evidence Discussion

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Products Studied

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.