Image for Goat's rue ()
Goat's rue (Galega officinalis)

Synonyms/Common Names/Related Substances:

  • Arginine, avanese (Italian), bitters, Bockskraut (German), capraggine (Italian), Caucasian goat's rue, cheese rennet, Fabaceae (family), false indigo, flavonoids, Fleckenkraut (German), French honeysuckle, French lilac, galactagogue, galega (Brazilian Portuguese, Dutch, Spanish), galéga officinal (French), Galega officinalis L., Galega officinalis herba, galegine, Gallega officinalis, galuteolin, Geissklee (German), Geissraute (German), Geissraute (German), geitvikke (Norwegian), getruta (Swedish), gewöhnliche Geissraute (German), glycosides, goat's rue, goats rue, goat's rue herb, goatsrue, guanidine, guanidine acetic acid, guanidinon-acetic acid, harilik kitsehernes (Estonian), Herba rutae caprariae, Italian fitch, jestřabina lékařská (Czech), kecskeruta (Hungarian), læge-stregbælg (Danish), metformin, oriental goat's rue, Papilionaceae (family), peganine, Pestilenzkraut (German), Pockenraute (German), professor-weed, Rhizobium galegae bv. officinalis, Rhizobium galegae, rue de chèvre (French), rutwica lekarska (Polish), saponins, Spanish sainfoin, stregbælg (Danish), Suchtkraut (German), tannins, Ziegenraute (German).

Clinical Bottom Line/Effectiveness

Brief Background:

  • Galega officinalis, commonly known as goat's rue, French lilac, Italian fitch, or professor-weed, is an herbaceous plant that is native to the Middle East and indigenous to southern Europe and western Asia. It has a mucilaginous, bitter, and astringent taste. The plant, which is normally without scent, emits a disagreeable odor when bruised. Goat's rue was introduced into the United States in 1891 as forage for livestock and is found in Utah, Pennsylvania, and New York. It is now considered a weed and has been put on the U.S. Federal Weed List.
  • According to secondary source, goat's rue has been documented to increase milk production in cows by 35-50%, and this was later confirmed by empirical evidence in other ruminants (34). It has been traditionally used to increase lactation and treat diabetes. Goat's rue has shown glycemic control and weight loss effects in animal and human studies.
  • According to animal and in vitro studies, goat's rue may have a potential interaction with hypoglycemic (1) and antiplatelet medications (2;3;4;5;6).
  • Galegine, a Galega extract, led to the development of the only approved biguanide antidiabetic drug, metformin (7;8). Metformin is listed on the current World Health Organization Model List of Essential Medicines as one of two oral antidiabetic medications.

Dosing/Toxicology

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Precautions/Contraindications

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Interactions

Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Mechanism of Action

  • Content available for subscribers only.

History

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Evidence Table

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Evidence Discussion

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Products Studied

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Author Information

  • Content available for subscribers only.

References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

  • Content available for subscribers only.
The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.