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Gamma oryzanol

Synonyms/Common Names/Related Substances:

  • 24-methylene cycloartanol, 24-methylenecycloartanol, 24-methylenecycloartanyl ferulate, beta-sitosterol, beta-sitosteryl ferulate calclate, campestrol, campesteryl ferulate, compestanyl ferulate, crude rice bran oil, cycloartanol, cycloartenol, cycloartenyl ferulate, cycloaternol, cyclobranol, Delta(7)-campestenyl ferulate, Delta(7)-sitostenyl ferulate, Delta(7)-stigmastenyl ferulate, ferulic acid, ferulic acid derivatives, ferulic acid esters, gammajust 50, gamma-orizanol, gamma-oryzanol, gamma-Oryzanol Fine Particle, gamma-oz, gammariza, gammatsul, guntrin, Hi-Z®, maspiron, oliver, oryvita, oryzaal, oryzanol, oz, rice bran oil, sitostanyl ferulate sitosteryl ferulate, sterols, stigmasterol, stigmasteryl ferulate, thiaminogen, triterpene alcohol, triterpenyl alcohol.

Clinical Bottom Line/Effectiveness

Brief Background:

  • Gamma oryzanol is a mixture of ferulic acid esters of sterol and triterpene alcohols, and it occurs in rice bran oil at a level of 1-2%, although it has been extracted from corn and barley oils as well (1). It is theorized that some of the health benefits from rice bran oil, namely, its cholesterol-lowering effects, may be due to its gamma oryzanol content.
  • Gamma oryzanol was first isolated and purified in the 1950s. In the 1960s, it was used medically in Japan for anxiety.
  • Gamma oryzanol is frequently sold as a body-building aid, specifically to increase testosterone levels, stimulate the release of endorphins (pain-relieving substances made in the body), and promote the growth of lean muscle tissue. However, most currently available studies do not support these claims (2;3).
  • Most clinical studies have focused on gamma oryzanol's lipid-lowering effects (4;5;6;7;8;9;10;11;12;13;14;15;16;17).
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Dosing/Toxicology

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Precautions/Contraindications

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Interactions

Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

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Mechanism of Action

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History

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Evidence Table

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Evidence Discussion

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Products Studied

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.