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Autohemotherapy

Related Terms

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Background

  • Autohemotherapy, or self-blood therapy, is a technique that involves the withdrawal of blood from the body and the reinjection of the same blood back into a vein or through the skin or muscle. The aim of the therapy is to enhance the immune system's ability to fight disease. The blood may be mixed with ozone (an unstable form of oxygen that some practitioners believe to have healing properties), an herbal (e.g., echinacea, to stimulate immune function), or a homeopathic remedy (e.g., a small amount alcohol or water) before being reinjected into a vein or through the skin or muscle.
  • Autohemotherapy was first described by the French physician Paul Ravaut in 1913. Practitioners of autohemotherapy believe that the reintroduction of one's own blood boosts immunity and vitality. Autohemotherapy is a common practice in Europe and South America and is performed to treat pain, ischemia (a lack of oxygen to the tissues), inflammation, and infections. Examples of illnesses and symptoms treated with autohemotherapy include arterial circulatory disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, bronchitis, allergies, acne, eczema, leg ulcers, and fungal infections. Autohemotherapy has also been used in combination with conventional cancer treatment, as well as to aid in smoking cessation and to speed up recovery after a long illness.
  • However, there is a lack of good-quality evidence to support the use of autohemotherapy for any medical condition.
  • Good-quality data on the safety of autohemotherapy are lacking, but there may be risks associated with this therapy.

Technique

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Theory/Evidence

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Safety

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.