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Canine scabies

Related Terms

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Background

  • Canine scabies, also called sarcoptic mange, is a highly contagious, pruritic (itchy) skin condition caused by infection with the burrowing mite, Sarcoptes scabiei. Sarcoptes scabiei is an oval-shaped, light-colored, microscopic parasite and a member of the order Acarina.
  • Dogs and foxes are the animals most prominently affected by scabies, but Sarcoptes scabiei has also been isolated from many different mammalian species including rabbits, guinea pigs, sheep, goats, calves, cats, and humans. This is not a definitive list of possible hosts for Sarcoptes scabiei, and theoretically, this lack of host specificity suggests that Sarcoptes scabiei could be transmitted to any mammal coming in direct contact with an infested animal.
  • Sarcoptes scabiei has been observed worldwide since the early 1900s. In 2001, 300 million people were estimated to have a skin disease caused by Sarcoptes scabiei.
  • Canine scabies has been found to primarily affect younger dogs and dogs in poor health. However, any dog that comes in contact with the mites may become infected. There appears to be no association between gender and scabies.
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Types of the Disease and Causes

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Risk Factors

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Signs and Symptoms

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Diagnosis

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Complications

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Treatment

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Integrative Therapies

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Prevention

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.