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Dance

Related Terms

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Background

  • Aerobic exercise is any activity that uses large muscle groups, can be maintained continuously, and is rhythmic in nature. It is a type of exercise that works the heart and lungs and causes them to work harder than at rest.
  • Aerobic dance movement tends to be repetitive and pounding. The American College of Sports Medicine recommends aerobic exercise done for a minimum of 20 minutes, three times a week at 60% of the maximum heart rate. Doing less than this will minimize your health benefits. Exercising 4 or more times a week will increase your health benefits.
  • The word "aerobics" was coined by Dr. Kenneth H. Cooper, a physician at the San Antonio Air Force Hospital in Texas, to denote a system of exercise he developed to help prevent coronary artery disease. Cooper's book about the exercise system, Aerobics, was published in 1968. A year later, Jackie Sorenson developed aerobic dance. a series of dance routines to improve cardiovascular fitness.
  • During the next two decades, aerobic dance and exercise in various forms spread throughout the United States and into other countries. The number of aerobics participants in the United States. alone grew from an estimated 6 million in 1978 to 19 million in 1982 and 22 million in 1987.
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Theory/Evidence

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Technique

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Safety

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.