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GRAS

Related Terms

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Background

  • Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) is a designation created by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1958 under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA). This act defines food additives as any substances intentionally added to food and states that food additives (with some exceptions) must be reviewed and approved by the FDA.
  • In the 1970s, the FDA developed the GRAS affirmation petition process to update the program, but funding difficulties developed. In 1997, the FDA proposed replacing the affirmation petition process with the GRAS notification program. Since then, FDA-approved food additives have been distinguished from GRAS substances based on the availability of pertinent substantive information to the public and its broad acceptance by qualified experts.

Gras Designation

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Gras Affirmation Petition Process

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Gras Notification Program

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Types of Gras Status

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Gras Designations

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Gras Lists

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Gras Versus Fda-Approved Designation

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Limitations With Gras

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Theory/Evidence

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Safety

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.