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Maple syrup diet

Related Terms

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Background

  • The maple syrup diet is a type of detoxification diet that is promoted for rapid weight loss. It has also purportedly been used to help treat ulcers, improve concentration and energy, clear skin, promote shiny hair, and make nails stronger. However, scientific evidence supporting these claims is lacking.
  • During the diet, people drink a mixture of maple syrup, freshly squeezed lemon juice, spring water, and cayenne pepper for an average of 10 days. During this time, some people may also take regular laxatives to help promote bowel movements. According to secondary sources, it is important to slowly return to solid foods after the diet period, due to possible problems, such as constipation. The process may be repeated generally as desired, although many proponents say it should not be repeated more than twice per month.
  • Safety concerns surrounding this diet are mainly related to the nutrient depletion that may occur. Any number of ailments, such as anemia, bone weakness, or electrolyte disturbances, may result due to lack of nutrients. This may pose serious problems.
  • Stanley Burroughs originally created the maple syrup diet in the 1950s. His book The Master Cleanser described the process as a detoxification plan aimed at clearing the body of toxins and internal waste, which he claims build up from an unhealthy lifestyle.
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Diet

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Theory/Evidence

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Safety

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.