Image for Weightlifting
Weightlifting

Related Terms

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Background

  • Weightlifting, also known as bodybuilding, is a form of exercise that results in muscular endurance and strength. Strength is not measured by the size or bulk of muscles. Instead strength is measured by the amount of weight lifted and the duration of exercises. Muscle strength increases with increased resistance (heavier weights), repetitions, number of sets and intensity (i.e. reducing recover periods between sets).
  • Most weight training involves isotonic exercises. Isotonic training muscle training involves contractions where tension is equal throughout the range of motion.
  • Isometric muscle training contraction of a muscle against an immovable force. For instance, muscles will flex and hold a stationary position when an individual pushes against a wall. This form is used most commonly in patients undergoing rehabilitation or physical therapy.
  • Isokinetic muscle training is a type of contraction where the speed of movement is fixed and resistance varies with the force exerted. In other words, resistance the harder an individual pushes or pulls, the more resistance is felt.
  • Further content available for subscribers only.

Free Weights

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Machine Resistance Weights

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Circuit Training

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Technique

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Postural Technique

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Safety

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Author Information

  • Content available for subscribers only.

References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

  • Content available for subscribers only.
The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.