Image for Guarumo()
Guarumo(Cecropia obtusifolia)

Synonyms/Common Names/Related Substances:

  • Akowa, ambai, Ambaiba palmate, ambaibo (Spanish), ambiabo, bois canon (French), bois trompette (French), Cecropiaceae (family), Cecropia amphichlora, Cecropia arachnoidea, Cecropia asperrima, Cecropia concolor, Cecropia dielsiana, Cecropia hondurensis, Cecropia mexicana, Cecropia obtusifolia,Cecropia obtusifolia Bertol, Cecropia pachystachya, Cecropia scabrifolia, Cecropia schreberiana, Cecropia surinamensis, certico, chancarpo, chancarro (Spanish), chlorogenic acid, embauba, golden trumpet tree, grayumbe, grayumbo, guarumbo (Spanish), guarumo (Spanish), hormigo, hormiguillo (Spanish), imbauba (Spanish), isoorientin, palo lija, pink trumpet tree, pop-a-gun, snakewood tree, tree-of-laziness, tree-of-sandpaper, trompette (French), trompettier, Trompetenbaum (German), trumpet tree, umbauba, yagruma (Spanish), yagrumo (Spanish), yaluma.
  • Note: The term "trumpet tree" has been applied to species of several genus, including Cecropia; however, plants of the genus Tabebuia are most commonly referred to as such. For information concerning Tabebuia, please refer to the monograph on pau d'arco. The data contained in this monograph are primarily concerned with Cecropiaobtusifolia, although research concerning other Cecropia species has been noted where deemed relevant.

Clinical Bottom Line/Effectiveness

Brief Background:

  • Guarumo, or Cecropia obtusifolia (Cecropiaceae), is a fruit-bearing tree that grows in the tropical Americas. Specifically, it is found in secondary vegetation in the tropical rain forest along both coasts of Mexico (1), as well as in Colombia, Costa Rica, and Panama. Its leaves are used in folk medicine for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. A number of closely related Cecropia species (including Cecropia peltata, Cecropia palmate, and Cecropia obtusifolia) are similar in appearance, chemical makeup, and traditional medicinal uses.
  • Traditionally, Cecropia obtusifolia has been used by Palikur indigenous tribes in Guyana and the Amazon basin, as well as by traditional healers in Cuba and other parts of Central and South America, for various ailments including arteriosclerosis, asthma, bone fractures, bruises, diarrhea, fever, genitalia infection, gonorrhea, herpes, kidney disorders, liver disorders, mouth and tongue sores, obesity, Parkinson's disease, rheumatic inflammation, skin diseases, warts, and wounds.
  • Recent evidence from clinical and animal studies supports the traditional use of the aqueous extract of Cecropia obtusifolia as an effective adjuvant in the control of type 2 diabetes. Clinical studies have shown that Cecropia obtusifolia reduces blood glucose in type 2 diabetic patients whose disease is not controlled or controlled by diet and exercise alone (2;3).
  • Animal studies have also indicated that aqueous leaf extract of Cecropia obtusifolia may induce a decrease in blood pressure (4) and have diuretic effects (5).
  • Further content available for subscribers only.

Dosing/Toxicology

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Precautions/Contraindications

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Interactions

Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Mechanism of Action

  • Content available for subscribers only.

History

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Evidence Table

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Evidence Discussion

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Products Studied

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Author Information

  • Content available for subscribers only.

References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

  • Content available for subscribers only.
The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.