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Haritaki (Terminalia chebula)

Synonyms/Common Names/Related Substances:

  • Abhaya (Sanskrit), amrita, black myroblan (Indian), chebulagic acid, chebulic acid, chebulic myroblan (Indian), chebulinic acid, chetaki, Combretaceae (family), fatty acids, fructus Chebulae, gall nut, harad (Hindi), harada, haradae, harade, harar (Indian), harida (Indian), haritaki (Sanskrit), horitoki, jivanti, kadukkaya (Tamil), karkchettu (Telugu), kashi, myroblan, putana, rohini, Terminalia chebula, Terminalia chebula Retz, vijaya.
  • Combination products: Aller-7® (extracts from Phyllanthus emblica, Terminalia chebula, Terminalia bellerica, Albizia lebbeck, Piper nigrum, Zingiber officinale, and Piper longum) (1), HP-1 (Phyllanthus niruri and extracts of Terminalia bellerica, Terminalia chebula, Phyllanthus emblica, and Tinospora cordifolia) (2), Ledretan-96 (a mixture of 23 herbs, including Terminalia chebula) (3), Padma 28 (aqueous extracts from Costi amari radix [costus root, the dried root of Saussurea lappa] and the outer cover of Myrobalani fructus [the dried fruit of Terminalia chebula]) (4), Triphala (Terminalia chebula, Terminalia bellerica, and Emblica officinalis) (5).

Clinical Bottom Line/Effectiveness

Brief Background:

  • Haritaki is a common herbaceous plant used extensively in Ayurvedic medicine, the traditional Indian system of treatment that involves the practice of holistic methods (6). There are seven types of haritaki fruit, including vijaya and jivanti (used for many purposes), rohini (wound healing), putana (external plastering), amrita (body purification), abhaya (external ophthalmic use), and chetaki (powder form as laxative).
  • Haritaki is used for a variety of conditions, the most common being constipation, digestive conditions, and infection.
  • Studies investigating the efficacy and safety of Terminalia chebula, Terminalia chebula Retz., or any multiherb formulations containing Terminalia chebula in humans, are lacking.

Dosing/Toxicology

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Precautions/Contraindications

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Interactions

Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

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Mechanism of Action

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History

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Evidence Table

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Evidence Discussion

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Products Studied

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.