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Kudzu (Pueraria lobata)

Synonyms/Common Names/Related Substances:

  • 6"-O-xyloglycitin, 6"-O-xylosyltectoridin, arrowroot, biochanin A, daidzein, daidzein 8-C-glucoside, daidzin, Fabaceae (family), flos Puerariae, formononetin, gegen (Chinese), gegen-tanj (TJ-1), genistein, genistin, glycetein, glycitin, isoflavonoids, Japanese arrowroot, kaikasaponin III (KS-III), kakkonto, Kampo, kudzu root, Kwao Kruea Khao, Leguminosae (family), NPI-028, NPI-031, NPI-031G, pedunsaponin B2, pedunsaponin C3, puer, Pueraria eduli, Pueraria flos, Pueraria lobata, Pueraria lobata L., Pueraria lobata Ohwi, Pueraria lobata root decoction, Pueraria lobata (Willd.), Pueraria lobata (Willd.) Ohwi, Pueraria mirifica, Pueraria montana, Pueraria omeiensis, Pueraria peduncularis, Pueraria phaseoloides, Pueraria thomsonii, Pueraria thunbergiana, Puerariae flos, Puerariae radix, Puerariae surculus, puerarin, radix Puerariae, spinasterol, tectoridin, tectorigenin, Tianbaokang, triterpenoids, Yufengningxin.
  • Selected combination products: NXTG (composed of milk vetch root, pueraria root, ligustici, ilex-puhesceus, and Manchurian wild ginger), STPG (proprietary blend consisting of soybean peptides, taurine, Pueraria isoflavone, and ginseng saponin).

Clinical Bottom Line/Effectiveness

Brief Background:

  • Kudzu originated in China and was brought to the United States from Japan in the late 1800s. It is distributed throughout much of the eastern United States and is most common in the southern part of the continent.
  • Kudzu root (Pueraria lobata (Willd.) Ohwi) and thomson kudzu root (Pueraria thomsonii) are often used interchangeably in traditional Chinese medicine (1).
  • Kudzu has been traditionally used in China to treat alcoholism, diabetes, gastroenteritis, cardiovascular diseases, diarrhea, dysentery, fever, and deafness (1;2).
  • Evidence suggests that kudzu may improve signs and symptoms of unstable angina, improve insulin resistance, and have a positive effect on cognitive function in postmenopausal women. However, most studies have suffered from methodological weaknesses and small sample sizes.
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Dosing/Toxicology

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Precautions/Contraindications

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Interactions

Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

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Mechanism of Action

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History

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Evidence Table

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Evidence Discussion

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Products Studied

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.