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Lactobacillus GG (Lactobacillus rhamnosus)

Synonyms/Common Names/Related Substances:

  • Actimel®, ATCC 53103, fresh poi, GG, L.casei, L.casei DN114001, L. GG, lactic acid bacteria, lactic acid-producing bacteria (LAB), Lactobacillus casei 37, Lactobacillus casei 4646, Lactobacillus casei DN-114001, Lactobacillus casei strain GG, Lactobacillus casei subsp. rhamnosus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus 12L, Lactobacillus rhamnosus 19070-2, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactobacillus strain GG, poi, probiotic, sour poi.

Clinical Bottom Line/Effectiveness

Brief Background:

  • Lactobacillus GG is scientifically known as Lactobacillus rhamnosus and was formerly known as a subspecies (rhamnosus) of the species Lactobacillus casei. Lactobacillus GG naturally inhabits the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of humans. Collectively, bacteria and yeast, which comprise the normal GI flora that are nonpathogenic and beneficial, are defined as "probiotics."
  • Probiotics have been investigated for a variety of health conditions, and Lactobacillus GG is best known for its potential role in treating or preventing diarrheal diseases.
  • There is fairly strong evidence for the use of Lactobacillus GG in the prevention of diarrhea or acute infections in children. There is also some evidence of benefit for the use of Lactobacillus GG in the treatment or prevention of other types of diarrhea (antibiotic associated, in adults, etc.). However, Lactobacillus GG does not appear to be effective for prevention of atopic dermatitis or in the maintenance of remission for Crohn's disease.
  • The reported effects of Lactobacillus GG in clinical trials are based on the use of studies using viable (live) and lyophilized cultures of Lactobacillus GG, commonly resuspended in liquid (e.g., oral rehydration solution, milk, or water).

Dosing/Toxicology

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Precautions/Contraindications

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Interactions

Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

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Mechanism of Action

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History

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Evidence Table

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Evidence Discussion

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Products Studied

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.