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Lovage (Levisticum officinale)

Synonyms/Common Names/Related Substances:

  • 4,5-Dimethyl-3-hydroxy-2[5H]-furanone (sotolone), β-phellandrene, α-Pinene, α-phellandrene/myrcene, ache de montagne, anjodan romi, aplo de Montana, badekraut, bladder seed, carvacrol eugenol céleri perpétuel, Cornish lavage, d-terpineol, devesil, garden lovage, gaya à tige simple, Goritsvet, gulyavitsa, harilik leeskputk, Italian lovage, lavas, legústico, lestyán, leuştean, leuşzean, levístico, Levisticum officinale, levistiko, liebstöckl, libeček, libeček lékařský, ligustico, liperi, lipstikka, livèche, ljekoviti ljupčac, lova, love parsley, løpstikke, løvstikke, lubbestok, lubczyk ogrodowy, luibh an liugair, lupstājs, lusch, luststock, maggikraut, maggiplant, magi-začin, mankracht, n-butyl-phthalide, n-butylidene phthalide old english lavage, rabaji, rabeji, reobwiji, robaji, robejji, robiji, robwiji, sea lovage, sedanonic anhydride, sedano di montagna, sedano di monte, selen, sirenas, siunas, skessujurt, vaistinė gelsvė, yuan xie gang gui, yuan ye dang gui, yuhn yihp dong gwai.

Clinical Bottom Line/Effectiveness

Brief Background:

  • Lovage (Levisticum officinale) is used for medicinal and culinary purposes, the latter due to its aromatic flavor. Folklore describes lovage as being used for its medicinal properties as early as the 14th century.
  • Lovage has been used to treat a variety of conditions including its use as a diuretic, and for regulation of menses (1). It is also used to treat digestive and respiratory conditions such as bronchitis, colic, and for its carminative and stomachic properties (2;3;4;5;6;7).
  • It was used by Spanish New Mexicans as an abortifacient and emmenagogue (8).
  • Lovage is generally recognized as safe for human consumption as a natural seasoning and flavoring agent by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) (9), however there are currently no well designed human or animal studies available involving lovage.

Dosing/Toxicology

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Precautions/Contraindications

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Interactions

Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

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Mechanism of Action

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History

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Evidence Table

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Evidence Discussion

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Products Studied

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.