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Mango seed fiber (Irvingia gabonensis)

Synonyms/Common Names/Related Substances:

  • 1,8-p-menthadien-7-ol, 1-p-menthen-7,8-diol, 2,3,8-tri-me ether ellagic acid, 2,3,8-tri-O-methyl ellagic acid, 2,3-diethyl-5-methylpyrazine, 2,5-dimethyl-4-hydroxy-3-(2H)furanone, 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, 2-ethyl-3,5-dimethylpyrazine, 2-phenylethyl glucoside, 2-phenylethyl rutinoside, 3,3',4'-tri-O-methylellagic acid, 3,4-di-O-methylellagic acid, 3-friedelanone, 9-hydroxymegastima-4,6-dien-3-one, 9-hydroxymegastima-4,7-dien-3-one, 9-hydroxymegastima-4-en-3-one, A-3 carene, acetic acid, African bush mango, African mango, African mango seed, African wild mango, agbono, alanine, aldehydes, alkaloids, alpha-curcumene, alpha-terpineol, alpha-terpinyl arabinoglucoside, alpha-terpinyl glucoside, alpha-terpinyl rutinoside, anthraquinones, arabinose, arginine, aspartic acid, benzoic acid, benzyl glucoside, benzyl rutinoside, beta-carotene, betulinic acid, bicyclogermacrene, boron, bread tree, bush mango, butan-2,3-dione, butyric acid, calcium, cardiac glycoside, carvacrol, cinnamic acid, cis-6-p-menthen-2,8-diol, cobalt, copper, cyanide, cysteine, dica nut, dika, dika nut, dikanut, dikka, dimethoxyellagic acid, duiker nut, ellagic acid, eremophilene, ethyl 3-hydroxybutyrate, etima, eugenyl glucoside, fiber, flavonoids, furaneol, furanyl glucoside, glucose, glutamic acid, glycerine, gossypol, gum, hardwickiic acid, hexanoic acid, hexanol, histadine, IGOB131®, Integra-Lean® Irvingia, iodine, iron, Irvingia, Irvingia barteri, Irvingia gabonensis, Irvingia gabonensis var. dulcis, Irvingia gabonensis var. excelsa, Irvingia gabonensis var. excelsia, Irvingia gabonensis var. gabonensis, Irvingia grandifolia, Irvingia malayana, Irvingia robur, Irvingia smithii, Irvingia wombolu, Irvingiaceae (family), isoleucine, isolongifolene, ixonanthaceae, Kaka, lauric acid, leucine, linalool oxide, linalyl oxide glucoside, lysine, magnesium, Mangifera gabonensis, Mangifera indica, mango seed, methional, methionine, methylbutanoic acid, methylgallate, monoterpene alcohols, myristic acid, nickel, nitrogen, OB131®, odika, ogbolo (Nigerian), oleanolic acid, oro (Nigerian), pectin, pectinesterase, pentan-2,3-dione, peroxide, phenylalanine, phosphorus, phytate, plant sterols, polygalacturonase, polyphenol oxidase, potassium, proline, rhamnose, saponins, serine, sodium, starch, stearic acid, steroids, tannins, threonine, trans-6-p-menthen-2,8-diol, tryptophan, tyrosine, ursolic acid, valine, vanillin, vanillyl glucoside, vitamin A, vitamin C, vomifoliol arabinoglucosides, vomifoliol glucosides, wild mango, (Z)-hexen-3-ol, zinc, zingiberene.

Clinical Bottom Line/Effectiveness

Brief Background:

  • Located throughout farms and tropical forests of central and western Africa, African mango (Irvingia gabonensis) trees are typically indentified by their 10-40-meter height, flared base, densely dark green foliage, elliptical leaves, yellow-white flower clusters, and spherical fruit (1).
  • Historically, African mango has been used commercially for the development of a diverse array of industrial products, such as foods, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals (2).
  • According to traditional medicinal practices, all parts of the African mango plant, namely the bark, seeds, leaves, and roots, may be used for therapeutic purposes. Antecdotally, African mango is believed to possess antibiotic and analgesic properties (1;3). Clincally, according to secondary sources, it has also been investigated for its potential therapeutic benefit for the management of obesity (4) and diabetes (5;6;7;8;9). However, definitive evidence in these areas is currently lacking, and additional research is warranted.

Dosing/Toxicology

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Precautions/Contraindications

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Interactions

Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

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Mechanism of Action

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History

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Evidence Table

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Evidence Discussion

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Products Studied

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.