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Motherwort (Leonurus artemisia, Leonurus cardiaca, Leonurus heterophyllus, Leonurus japonicus, Leonurus sibiricus, Leonurus spp.)

Synonyms/Common Names/Related Substances:

  • Agripalma, agripaume (French), alkaloids, apigenin glucosides, caffeic acid, caffeic acid 4-rutinoside, calcium oxalate, carotenoids, Chanshukang Granules, Chinese motherwort, coumarins, diterpenes, epicatechin, ferulic acid, flavones, flavonoids, flavonols, genkwanin, herba Leonuri, hydrosols, hyperoside, i-mu-ts'ao (Chinese), iridoides, iridoids, isoquercetrin, Japanese motherwort, kaempferol glucosides, Lamiaceae (family), leocardin, leonurine, Leonurus, Leonurus artemisia, Leonurus cardiaca, Leonurus heterophyllus Sweet, Leonurus japonicus Houtt., Leonurus L., Leonurus sibiricus L., lion's ear, lion's tail, LJAMP1, LJAMP2, monosaccharides, monoterpenes, mother wort, mother's wort, polyphenolcarboxylic acids, polyphenols, polysaccharides, procyanidin B2, quercetin, quercetrin, quercitin, quinqueloside, Roman motherwort, rutin, sesquiterpenes, stachydrine, sterols, tannins, throw-wort, triterpenes, vitamin A, volatile oils, wormwood-like motherwort herb, yi mu cao.

Clinical Bottom Line/Effectiveness

Brief Background:

  • Motherwort (Leonurus artemisia, Leonurus cardiaca, Leonurus heterophyllus, Leonurus japonicus, Leonurus sibiricus, Leonurus spp.) is a perennial plant native to Asia that today can be found growing around the world. Because of the resemblance of the plant's leaves to the tail of a lion, motherwort is also known as "lion's tail" and "lion's ear."
  • Motherwort has a long history of use in traditional medicine in China and other cultures. Motherwort has been traditionally used most widely in women's health conditions (childbirth, postpartum care, irregular menstrual cycles, and premenstrual anxiety) and to treat cardiac disorders. These uses are the sources of the names "motherwort" and L. cardiaca for one species of motherwort.
  • Clinical trials have investigated the use of motherwort as part of herbal formulations for a variety of conditions, including benign prostate hyperplasia, gout, kidney disease, and irritable bowel syndrome, and as a sedative. However, few trials have explored the use of motherwort alone. For this reason, strong scientific evidence supporting the clinical use of motherwort for any indication is lacking. High-quality trials of motherwort as a monotherapy are needed before conclusions can be drawn about the use of this herb to treat any condition in humans.

Dosing/Toxicology

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Precautions/Contraindications

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Interactions

Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

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Mechanism of Action

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History

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Evidence Table

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Evidence Discussion

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Products Studied

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.