Image for Myrcia
Myrcia

Synonyms/Common Names/Related Substances:

  • Beta-amyrin, catechin, desmanthin-1, gallic acid, ginkgoic acid, guaijaverin, mearnsitrin, Myrcia multiflora, Myrcia salicifolia, Myrcia sphaerocarpa, Myrcia uniflora, myricitrin myrciacitrin I, myrciacitrin II, myrciacitrins III, myrciacitrin VI, myrciacitrin V, myrciaphenone A, myrciaphenone B, Myrtaceae, pedra hume caá, pedra-ume-caá, quercitrin, rodwood.
  • Note: Do not confuse Myrcia (Myrtaceae family) with the bayberry genus Myrica (or Morella in Myricaceae family).

Clinical Bottom Line/Effectiveness

Brief Background:

  • Pedra hume caá is a medium-sized shrub that grows in drier regions of the Amazon and other parts of Brazil. In Brazil, the common name pedra hume caá refers to three species of myrcia plants that are used interchangeably-Myrcia salicifolia, Myrcia uniflorus, and Myrcia sphaerocarpa. It is unknown if reports on pedra hume caá can be applied to other species in the myrcia genus.
  • Pedra hume caá has been used by indigenous tribes in the rainforest for diabetes, diarrhea, and dysentery. The Taiwanos tribe (in northwest Amazonia) considers the leaves to be astringent and use it for persistent diarrhea. It has had a place in Brazilian traditional medicine for many years.
  • It remains a very popular natural remedy for diabetes throughout South America; the traditional use is a simple leaf tea with a pleasant, slightly sweet taste. It is also used for hypertension, enteritis, hemorrhage, and mouth ulcers.
  • Currently, there is one small trial available addressing the use of Myrcia uniflora in diabetic humans.

Dosing/Toxicology

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Precautions/Contraindications

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Interactions

Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Mechanism of Action

  • Content available for subscribers only.

History

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Evidence Table

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Evidence Discussion

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Products Studied

  • Content available for subscribers only.

Author Information

  • Content available for subscribers only.

References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

  • Content available for subscribers only.
The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.