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Lovage (Levisticum officinale)
While some complementary and alternative techniques have been studied scientifically, high-quality data regarding safety, effectiveness, and mechanism of action are limited or controversial for most therapies. Whenever possible, it is recommended that practitioners be licensed by a recognized professional organization that adheres to clearly published standards. In addition, before starting a new technique or engaging a practitioner, it is recommended that patients speak with their primary healthcare provider(s). Potential benefits, risks (including financial costs), and alternatives should be carefully considered. The below monograph is designed to provide historical background and an overview of clinically-oriented research, and neither advocates for or against the use of a particular therapy.

Related Terms

  • β-phellandrene, α-pinene, α-phellandrene/myrcene, ache de montagne, anjodan romi, aplo de Montana, badekraut, bladder seed, carvacrol eugenol céleri perpétuel, Cornish lavage, d-terpineol, devesil, garden lovage, gaya à tige simple, Goritsvet, gulyavitsa, harilik leeskputk, Italian lovage, lavas, legústico, lestyán, leustean, leuszean, levístico, Levisticum officinale, levistiko, liebstöckl, libecek, libecek lékarský, ligustico, liperi, lipstikka, livèche, ljekoviti ljupcac, lova, love parsley, løpstikke, løvstikke, lubbestok, lubczyk ogrodowy, luibh an liugair, lupstajs, lusch, luststock, maggikraut, maggiplant, magi-zacin, mankracht, n-butyl-phthalide, n-butylidene phthalide old english lavage, rabaji, rabeji, reobwiji, robaji, robejji, robiji, robwiji, sea lovage, sedanonic anhydride, sedano di montagna, sedano di monte, selen, sirenas, siunas, skessujurt, vaistine gelsve, yuan xie gang gui, yuan ye dang gui, yuhn yihp dong gwai.

Background

  • Lovage (Levisticum officinale) has been used for medicinal purposes as early as the 14th century. In herbal medicine, it is used to expel flatulence (gas), induce perspiration, open obstructions, and to treat colic in children. Lovage has also been used in the treatment of jaundice, kidney stones, poor appetite, and bronchitis. Lovage has been used as a diuretic, and for regulation of menses. Aromatherapists have used the essential oil of lovage to remove freckles and spots from the face.
  • Lovage is generally recognized as safe for human consumption as a natural seasoning and flavoring agent by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). However, there are currently no well-designed human or animal studies available involving lovage.

Evidence

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Dosing

The below doses are based on scientific research, publications, traditional use, or expert opinion. Many herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested, and safety and effectiveness may not be proven. Brands may be made differently, with variable ingredients, even within the same brand. The below doses may not apply to all products. You should read product labels, and discuss doses with a qualified healthcare provider before starting therapy.

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Safety

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

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Interactions

Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.