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Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis)

Synonyms/Common Names/Related Substances:

  • (-)-camphene, (-)-methyl jasmonate, 1,8-cineole, 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenylmethanol, 5-hydroxy-7,4'-dimethoxyflavone, 7-alpha-methoxyabieta-8,13-diene-11,12-dione-(20,6beta)-olide, 7-beta-methoxyabieta-8,13-diene-11,12-dione-(20,6beta)-olide, 12-O-methylcarnosic acid, Albus (cultivar), alecrim (Portuguese), alpha-pinene, Arp (cultivar), Aureus (cultivar), Benenden Blue (cultivar), biberiye (Turkish), Blue Boy (cultivar), borneol, bornyl acetate, caffeic acid, camphor, carnosic acid, carnosol, cis-4-glucosyloxycinnamic acid, Colorlife® powdered rosemary concentrate, compass plant, compass-weed, dendrolivano (Greek), dentrolivano (Greek), dew of the sea, diosmin, diterpenes, eklil kuhi (Persian), epirosmanol, eriocitrin, eucalyptol, Fierabras, flavones, genkwanin, Golden Rain (cultivar), harilik rosmariin (Estonian), hasalban (Turkish), Herbalox® Type O oleoresin rosemary extract, Herbor 025, hesperidin, hispidulin 7-O-glucoside, honey of rosemary, Hungary water, iklil al-jabal (Arabic), Incensier (cultivar), Irene (cultivar), isoscutellarein 7-O-glucoside, Ken Taylor (cultivar), kuşdili otu (Turkish), lá hu'o'ng thao (Vietnamese), Labiatae (family), Lamiaceae (family), luteolin, luteolin 3'-O-(3"-O-acetyl)-beta-D-glucuronide, luteolin 3'-O-(4"-O-acetyl)-beta-D-glucuronide, luteolin 3'-O-beta-d-glucuronide, linalool, Lockwood de Forest (cultivar), Majorca Pink (cultivar), mannenrou (Japanese), methanol (MeOH), mi die xiang (Chinese), Miss Jessop's Upright (cultivar), monoterpenes, old man, oleoresin rosemary, Oxy'less®, p-cymene, phenols, pilgrim's flower, Pinkie (cultivar), polar plant, polyphenolic compounds, Prostratus (cultivar), Pyramidalis (cultivar), Queen of Hungary water, quinate, ro ju ma ri (Korean), romaní (Catalan), romarin (French), romarin commun (French), romer (Catalan), romero (Spanish, Tagalog), romero común (Spanish), roozumari (Japanese), roozumarii (Japanese), rosemary honey (Miel de La Alcarria, Spain), Roseus (cultivar), rosmanol, Rosmanox®, rosmaquinone A, rosmaquinone B, rosmariin (Estonian), rosmariini (Finnish), rosmarin (Danish, German, Norwegian, Swedish), rósmarín (Icelandic), Rosmarini folium, rosmarinic acid, rosmarino (Italian), Rosmarinus acid, Rosmarinus officinalis, Rosmarinus officinalis L. var. genuina forma erectus, Rosmarinus tomentosus, Rosmarinus tomentosus Huber-Morath & Maire, rosmario (Spanish), rosumarin (Japanese), rozemarijn (Dutch), rozmari (Greek, Persian), rozmarin (Bulgarian, Hebrew, Romanian, Russian), rozmarín (Slovakian), rožmarin (Slovenian), rozmarín lekársky (Slovakian), rozmaring (Hungarian), rozmaryn (Polish, Ukranian), rozmarýn lékařský (Czech), rozmaryn spravzhnii (Ukranian), rozmarýna (Czech), rozmarýna lékařská (Czech), rozumarii (Japanese), ružmarin (Croatian, Serbian), sædögg (Icelandic), seco-hinokiol, Severn Sea (cultivar), Spanish rosemary, Suffolk Blue (cultivar), thymol, triterpenes, Tuscan blue (cultivar), verbenone.
  • Selected combination products: CognoBlend™ (Bacopa monneria extract, Gingko biloba extract, cat's claw extract, gotu kola extract, rosemary extract), Flower Pharm® (cottonseed, cinnamon, and rosemary oil) and Indoor Pharm® (soybean, rosemary, and lavender oil), Prolong® P (rosemary, thyme, marjoram mixture), Fruit & Vegetable Insect Spray (rosemary, cinnamon, clove oil, and garlic extract), Armorex™, DUL-X Red Point Warming Cream (rosemary, eucalyptus, and arnica).

Clinical Bottom Line/Effectiveness

Brief Background:

  • Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis Linn.) is a common aromatic evergreen shrub grown in many parts of the world. The fresh and dried leaves are used frequently as a food preservative and in traditional Mediterranean cuisine as a flavoring agent.
  • Historically, rosemary has been used medicinally to treat renal colic and dysmenorrhea. It has also been used to relieve symptoms caused by respiratory disorders and to stimulate the growth of hair. Today, extracts of rosemary are often used in aromatherapy to treat anxiety-related conditions and to increase alertness.
  • The most well-studied constituents of rosemary are caffeic acid and its derivative rosmarinic acid. These compounds are thought to have antioxidant properties and are under investigation as potential therapies for cancer, hepatotoxicity, and inflammatory conditions.
  • Currently, high-quality human trials investigating rosemary and its possible therapeutic applications are lacking. A small number of methodologically weak studies show some promise in the improvement of mental state (via aromatherapy) and as a treatment for alopecia.

Dosing/Toxicology

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Precautions/Contraindications

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Interactions

Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

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Mechanism of Action

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History

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Evidence Table

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Evidence Discussion

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Products Studied

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.