Image for  Tree tobacco (Nicotiana glauca)
Tree tobacco (Nicotiana glauca)

Synonyms/Common Names/Related Substances:

  • Akkue musa, anabasine, Brazilian tree tobacco, buena moza, California tree tobacco, cestrum, chlorinated amides, coneton, corneton, cotinine, coyote tobacco, don juan, gandul, gigante, glycosylated cyclohexenone derivatives, isil pivat, jantwak, le tabaque glauque, mahasatpurush, maria-juana, masseyss, Mexican tobacco, mustard tree, myosmine, Nicotiana arborea, nicotine, nornicotine, palau pazau, punche, quercitin, (R)-anabasine, rape, rutin, (S)-anabasine, San Juan tree, satpurush, scopoletin, scopolin, Solanaceae (family), stigmasterol-3-beta-O-D-glucopyranoside, taba, tabaco Cimarron, tabaco moro, tobacco plant, tree tobacco, triacontanol, vitamin D3, wildetabak, wild tobacco, wild tree tobacco, yellow tree tobacco.
  • Note: Tree tobacco (Nicotiana glauca) should not be confused with smoking tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), although the plants are in the same genus and have similar plant chemistries.

Clinical Bottom Line/Effectiveness

Brief Background:

  • Tree tobacco is a common plant in California, and is found in Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Maryland, New Jersey, Iowa, Hawaii, and other areas. It is on the list of toxic plants in several states, including Texas, California, and North Carolina. Native Americans in some areas substitute it for native tobacco (1). To enhance the spiritual experience, tree tobacco is sometimes smoked by California Native Americans in combination with Datura wrightii, which may be dangerous as both plants induce respiratory depression (1).
  • Tree tobacco has been publicized as a safe, hallucinogenic plant on some Internet websites (1). However, smoking or ingesting the plant has lead to death (2;3;4;5;6;7). Although goats, sheep, cows, and horses have died or suffered from birth defects due to eating this plant, teratogenic effects of this plant in humans have not been reported (8;9;10;11;12;13;14;15;16;17;18;19;20;21).
  • There is insufficient evidence in humans to support the use of tree tobacco for any indication. However, a decoction of tree tobacco leaves has been investigated for hepatoprotective properties and found to have modest effects in a rodent model (22).
  • Tree tobacco (Nicotiana glauca) should not be confused with smoking tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), although the plants are in the same genus and have similar plant chemistries. However, tree tobacco has much more anabasine, a nicotine-like alkaloid, than smoking tobacco.

Dosing/Toxicology

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Precautions/Contraindications

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Interactions

Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

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Mechanism of Action

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History

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Evidence Table

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Evidence Discussion

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Products Studied

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.