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White water lily (Nymphaea odorata)

Synonyms/Common Names/Related Substances:

  • Afzelin, alkaloids, American white pond lily, American white water lily, Castalia odorata (Dryander), cow cabbage, fragrant water lily, gallic acid, icariside, kaempferol 3-O-alpha-l-rhamnopyranoside, large white water lily, lignans, lily pad, myricetin 3-O (6-O-acetyl)-beta-d-galactopyranoside, myricetin 3-O-alpha-l-rhamnopyranoside, myricetin 3-O-beta-d-galactopyranoside, myricitrin, Nuphar advena, Nuphar luteum, Nymphaea alba, Nymphaea ampla DC., Nymphaea caerulea Sav., Nymphaea lotus, Nymphaea odorata (Dryander) Aiton, Nymphaea odorata Ait. ssp. tuberosa (Paine) Wiersma and Hellquist, Nymphaea rubra, Nymphaea stellata Willd., Nymphaea tuberosa, Nymphaeaceae (family), nymphaeoside A, quercetin 3-O-(6-O-acetyl)-beta-d-galactopyranoside, quercetin 3-O-alpha-l-rhamnopyranoside, sweet water lily, sweet-scented water lily, tannins, tartaric acid, water cabbage, water lily, water nymph, white pond lily.

Clinical Bottom Line/Effectiveness

Brief Background:

  • The use of white water lily (Nymphaea odorata) for medicinal purposes originates from Native American traditional medicine.
  • Several other species from the Nymphaea and Nuphar (another water lily genus) genera have been used in traditional Chinese medicine, Ayurveda, and homeopathic practices (1).
  • The dried root and rhizome of the white water lily have been used orally to treat gastrointestinal, genital, and bronchial conditions. The leaves and roots have also been used externally, as infusions to treat lesions and inflammation associated with mucous membranes, and as poultices to treat a variety of dermatological conditions.
  • Some of the medicinal properties of white water lily may be attributed to its reported antibiotic and astringent properties, which may be the result of tannic and gallic acids found in the plant tissue.
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Dosing/Toxicology

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Precautions/Contraindications

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Interactions

Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

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Mechanism of Action

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History

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Evidence Table

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Evidence Discussion

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Products Studied

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.