Image for  Wild arrach ()
Wild arrach (Chenopodium vulvaria)

Synonyms/Common Names/Related Substances:

  • Chenopodiaceae (family), Chenopodium olidum, Chenopodium vulvaria, phytoncides, stinking goosefoot.

Clinical Bottom Line/Effectiveness

Brief Background:

  • Wild arrach (Chenopodium vulvaria), or stinking goosefoot, can be easily identified by its rotten-fish smell, due to its trimethylamine content (1). The plant is native to Europe and is found in areas of North America as well. One preliminary laboratory study found that a related plant, Chenopodium botrys, has some antiprotist activity (2). There is insufficient evidence currently available in humans to support the use of Chenopodium vulvaria for any indication.

Dosing/Toxicology

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Precautions/Contraindications

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Interactions

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Mechanism of Action

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History

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Evidence Table

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Evidence Discussion

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Products Studied

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Author Information

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References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.